Revision Reflection I

From last wednesday to today, I’ve spent a couple scattered hours working on revising my literacy analysis. From my first draft, I was given some advice to expand where I made connections between the experts of literacy and my own analysis as well as to the pool of literacy narratives that my analysis is based on. My conclusion was lacking in leaving a final impact and wasn’t fully expressing my train of though, that was one paragraph that multiple people commented on. So I spent most of my time trying to find evidence and quotes that I could mix in to ‘beef up’ my essay.

My introduction to the essay was completely rearranged and put in a slightly more functional order that I think will allow others to follow better. But it still needs some work to allow a reader to get the gist of the conversation upfront. To be able to better understand what question I am trying to answer.

One of the reasons that my conclusion continues to struggle is because my introduction fails to provide the base for it. Without a solid introduction, my conclusion can’t reach as far as I want it to. To properly do this, I need to continue to take in more from Alexander, Brandt and Delpit. Such as Brandt’s ideas behind sponsorship and her conclusion. Or Delpit’s example of a relationship leading to success.

An essential piece to academic writing is willing to go back and change things. To actually revise and look at the overall picture. Look at what the essay asks of the writer and then look at how you can go past that to actually create something rather than simply rearranging information into your own words. Academic writing should have the writer’s own ideas and influence on the paper. It is also important to go beyond concepts, there needs to be actual evidence in a paper. Not just ideas, proof behind them.

One comment

  1. Eric Drown says:

    This is a really solid reflection on your writing process, Cali. It shows high levels of self-awareness as you examine your work and try to improve it. Your last paragraph displays understanding and commitment to two of the highest values of academics – the willingness to rethink, consider new evidence, and the desire to create something new that’s useful in our effort to understand the world.

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